Accession of the Russian Federation to the World Trade Organization

Russia’s accession to the WTO cleared a major hurdle when the WTO Working Party on its accession approved, ad referendum on 10 November 2011, the package spelling out Russia’s terms of entry to the organization. The Working Party will now send its accession recommendation to the 15 – 17 December Ministerial Conference, where Ministers are expected to approve the documents and accept Russiaas a WTO Member. [1]

All unrestricted WTO documents on accession of Russian Federation.

As part of the accession accord, Russia has agreed to undertake a series of important commitments to further open its trade regime and accelerate its integration in the world economy. The deal offers a transparent and predictable environment for trade and foreign investment.

From the date of accession, the Russian Federationhas committed to fully apply all WTO provisions, with recourse to very few transitional periods (see details below). The Russian Federation’s commitments will include the following:[2]

  • Market access for goods
  • Market access for services
  • Export duties
  • General commitments on market access
  • Industrial and agricultural subsidies
  • Pricing of energy
  • Sanitary and phytosanitary measures (SPS) and technical barriers to trade (TBT)
  • Trade-related investment measures
  • Protection of trade-related intellectual property
  • Transparency
  • Functioning of the Custom Union betweenRussia,KazakhstanandBelarus

There is considerable concern about the disparity in incomes in Russia. The richest Russian regions are 67 times richer than the poorest Russian regions in nominal terms and 33 times richer when price differences between the regions are taken into account (World Bank, 2005). The richest regions include the European North, Moscowand the resource rich regions of Siberia and the Far East. The poorest regions include the North Caucuses, Southern Siberia and Central Russia.[3]

All text is reposted Ipsis litteris from its official sources for information purposes only.

Bilateral Relations Brazil – Finland

On February, 14 2012, Mr Jyrki Katainen, Prime Minister of Finland was received by Dilma Roussef, President of Brazil, with the second largest ever official delegation sent from Finland to anywhere in the world. They talked about strengthening bilateral cooperation on science, technology, innovation and education.

On Education, Mr Katainen assumed the commitment of providing better access to institutions and research centers in Finland, to students and researchers under the Brazilian national program Science without Borders. Representatives from the Brazilian national institutions that coordinate the program will sign an agreement that adds Finland to the program. It has also been agreed on adding the entrepreneurial sector to the educational opportunity in order to qualify workers already in the job market.

It the press release by the Brazilian Ministry of External Relations, it is said that in order to strengthen bilateral cooperation on environmental issues, the countries are structuring a Memorandum of Understanding.

The bilateral diplomatic relations between Brazil and Finland has in records 6 (six) bilateral treaties, from which two are not valid. The existing agreements are as follows:

  • Agreement on Economic and Industrial Cooperation – celebrated in 1981 and put into force in 1983
  • Agreement on Cultural, Educational and Scientific Cooperation – celebrated in 1988 and put into force in 1990
  • Agreement to avoid double taxation and to prevent tax evasion on matters of income taxes – celebrated in 1996 and put into force in 1997
  • Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation in the Areas of Climate Change and the Development and Execution of Projects under the Clean Development Mechanism from the Kyoto Protocol – celebrated and put into force in 1997

It is important that private sector, civil society and other interests groups follow up on these governmental agreements. They are important instruments and subsidies for project development initiated by institutions other than governmental agencies.

Roadmap for discussion for the United Nations Conference for Sustainable Development (UNCSD)

The United Nations Organization plan

Agenda 21

Global Compact

ICC Anti-corruption policy and business practices:The Anti-Corruption Commission encourages self-regulation by enterprises in confronting issues and provides business input into international initiatives to fight corruption.

Business Objectives for the UN convention against corruption: Monitoring, technical Assistance, and asset recovery.

ICC Rules of conduct and recommendations: Enterprises should establish reasonable controls and procedures; follow-up and promote the rules.

Natural Resouces

The U.S., Australia, Brazil, Indonesia, and island states across the Pacific and Caribbean are among those advancing calls for more marine environments to be placed under legal protection, providing sanctuary for threatened species, habitats and ecosystems.

  • Public Health
  • Water

Corporate Sustainability

  • Energy and climate
  • Water and ecosystems
  • Agriculture and food
  • Social development
  • Urbanization and cities
  • Economics and Finance of sustainable development

Governmental subsidies to foreign companies in Belgium looking for access to European markets

On March 5th 2012, in Curitiba Brazil, Thierry Muschang, a Luxembourg PwC Director, presented the beneficial aspects of the project for attracting foreign companies to the Belgium / Louxembourg region, constructed in partnership with IDELUX, a government agency that was represented at the meeting by Joel Marinozzi, the Business Development Manager from the Economic Development Division, while in a mission in Brazil. The meeting was organized by the local Center for International Business (CIN) at the Federation of Industries of the State of Paraná (FIEP) and had the support of the Consulate General of Belgium in São Paulo, Brazil.

Located at the heart of Europe, the region of Belgium/Luxembourg means a strategic gateway to the European markets, very competitive in the international logistics point of view. This advantage is enhanced by the local government subsidies offered to foreign companies and specially start-ups who wish to install a regional office and/or a regional manufacturing distribution warehouse.

South African trade mission to Brazil

The South African delegation on a trade mission to Brazil was receptioned in the city of Curitiba this past week by the local trade association (ACP) in partnership with the Federation of Industries in the State of Paraná (FIEP). The mission received the support of the consulate general of South Africa in São Paulo and the Department of Trade and Industry of South Africa, and was composed by delegates from the wine industry, energy, civil engineering, architecture and tourism sectors.

Many of the delegates, specialy from the construction sector, were involved in the preparation for the World Cup 2010 in South Africa, and had the goal of identifying business opportunities in Brazil in order to transfer know how for the preparation of the upcoming World Cup 2014. Juliana Michelon Alvarenga from Aldeota Global, accompained by Wagner Giovani Silva, a technology manager from SOCIESC, a regional educational institution for technology development, met with a couple of the companies during the business rounds.

During the first meeting with Mr Fumani Dlomu, the director for Avuxeni Construction CC, a company from Highveld that provides electrical engineering services, the subject addressed was the solar energy market in SouthAfrica. According to Mr Dlomu, the sector is expanding and continuous growth is foreseen specially for low income housing programs. The equipment is today imported from China and specially Korea, being the later the equipments with better efficiency than chinese solar technology. He also mentioned that it is very promising to promote transfer of technology to South Africa. Aldeota Global also presented information on the Ex-Im Bank financing alternatives for importing US solar energy systems into Africa.

The last meeting was with The Western Cape Investment and Trade Promotion Agency of South Africa (WESGRO). The head of international trade and development, Mrs Seanne Kube, mentioned her concerns about how tough the Brazilian market is when in their attempts to conquer market share with the South African products. She also spoke about the well developed medicine technology capacity of the country and how the first open heart transplant was sucessfully executed in South Africa.

Aldeota Global also presented a pac to the members of the delegation with a document containing the highlights from the study recently published by The World Bank in partnership with IPEA, the Institute of Applied Economic Research, entitled Bridging the Atlantic, Brazil and Sub-Saharan Africa: South-south partnership for growth. The highlights were on the investment and economic complementarities between Brazil and African countries.